Biggs & Gunst P.C.
Counselors, Problem Solvers, Results

COUNSELORS•PROBLEM SOLVERS•RESULTS

RECREATIONAL BOATING

Recreational Boating Accidents

          Surrounded by four of the five Great Lakes and covered with over 26,000 small inland lakes, Michigan is a boaters’ paradise.  With nearly 800,000 registered boats, Michigan has the third highest number of registered boats in the country.  During the summer months Michiganders take to Michigan’s waterways to enjoy pleasure boating, fishing and various water sports activities.

          Unfortunately, accidents on the water happen.  In 2016 there were 125 US Coast Guard reported boating accidents resulting in 38 fatalities, these numbers have increased since 2015.  If you are involved in a recreational boating accident in Michigan it is important that you contact an experienced maritime attorney to adequately protect your rights and ensure you receive the compensation you deserve.  

          Michigan’s combination of great lakes and inland waterways present unique issues as they relate to general maritime law jurisdiction.  If a boating accident did not occur on navigable waters then there is no general maritime jurisdiction in the matter.  The Supreme Court has defined “navigable waters” as all waters, including lakes, waterways, rivers, harbors, and oceans, which are being used by vessels or capable of being used in interstate or foreign commerce. The Daniel Ball, 77 U.S. 557 (1871). Accordingly, the laws that apply in an accident differ greatly depending on which of Michigan's many waterway it occurred. 

          If you are involved in a boating accident in Michigan it is important that you hire an experienced maritime attorney to counsel you and protect your legal rights.  The attorneys of Biggs & Gunst are experienced in maritime law, will work hard to make sure your case is resolved quickly and get you the compensation you deserve.

          If you or a loved one has been involved in a boating accident Contact Us immediately to discuss your rights.   

Back to Maritime Law